2 Way Radios and the Information You Need to Know

Can not get over how economical the radio earpiece is, a tremendous deal for any top-end product!

A 2 way radio differs from a broadcast radio in the sense that it can receive as well as send messages and can be used for communication between two people. These types of radios are available in several different configurations. These include the hand held radios, mobile radios and stationary base radios. These radios can either operate in a full duplex mode or a half duplex mode. In the full duplex mode, these radios can be used for both sending and receiving data at the same time over different channels.

In the half duplex mode, these radios can be used for either sending or receiving data over a single channel. There are various things that one needs to know about the 2 way radios . These radios are very compact, are light weight and are available at a very affordable cost. These radios are available in different styles and are used for a large number of applications.
These radios generally have a push to talk button that make it very convenient to use and easy to handle. These radios are available with either rechargeable batteries or replaceable batteries. These batteries can either be made of nickel and cadmium or of lithium ion.

The 2 way radios operate in different ranges. The range specifies the distance that can be covered by these radios for communication. These radios can operate over short ranges or long ranges. This depends upon various factors like the frequency, the type of terrain etc.
Most of these types of radios operate in line of sight frequencies. This means that they cannot work well in hilly areas and in places where there are obstructions. These radios come with a large number of features. These radios are even made compatible with computers so that they can be used for sending data from one computer to another computer.

Another thing that users must know about 2 way radios is that these can even be used for hands free communication as these are available with handsets. These radios may or may not require licenses for their use. When these radios are used for personal purposes, the need of licenses does not arise.
If these radios are used for the purpose of business or in organizations, then the users need to obtain licenses for their use.
The 2 way radios operate on different channels. Since these channels are open, anyone can listen to the communication or intercept the messages being sent. To prevent this, these radios come with a privacy code. Also most of these radios are provided with scanning functions so that the channels can be automatically scanned for and manual setting of channels is not required.

These radios can be purchased from stores that deal in electric gadgets or can be bought online. The internet is the best place to buy these radios as a user can compare the various types of radios available and then choose the best one. This ensures that the user gets the best deal and does not end up purchasing a radio that does not satisfy the requirements of a user.

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Making “Her” Into Reality

Thankyou for reading my site, heres a piece of writing i actually enjoyed reading. With their authorization i can repost it. I write plenty of my own content, but irregularly post other content i find interesting, thanks for reading.

Spike Jonze’s latest movie, “Her,” creates a future where technology is less visible, yet more ubiquitous than today. The main character uses an earpiece and handheld device to communicate with an operating system that follows a user across any platform, rarely utilizing the traditional desktop screens except when at work. And the main way of interacting with the operating system is through natural, conversational speech.

Even though it is science fiction, “Her” seems to be the end state for many current acquisitions and research from real-life tech companies. These companies are pursuing enhanced artificial intelligence and speech recognition. And the companies who don’t jump on this future will be left in the digital dust.

Established artificial intelligence
The most well-known characters in AI today are IBM’s Watson and Apple’s Siri.

Watson takes human’s natural language and filters through data to find the most probable answers. It can take “unstructured data,” that is, data computers typically cannot read because it isn’t structured in tables, rows, or columns, and turn it into knowledge accessible not through complex queries but simple, vocal questions. It’s now being used to help doctors find better cancer treatments and financial planners find better investments. IBM hopes Watson will bring in $1 billion in revenue by 2018.

Siri first debuted in Apple’s iPhone 4S, allowing for simple functions like searching the web and initiating a call or writing a text message. The latest iOS version added more functionality for Siri, like sourcing information from Wikipedia and Twitter.

Apple’s latest acquisitions point to further enhancements for Siri. In 2013, the company picked up intelligent calendar application Cue, which helps layout a user’s day similar to Google Now. It also bought Topsy, which allowed customers to analyze and search social posts. And, a recently published patent points to expanding Siri from phones to docks.

Up and coming AI
Now, Google spent a rumored $400 million on an artificial intelligence company called DeepMind. DeepMind’s website describes its software as useful in “simulations, e-commerce, and games,” and the company has an impressive talent list with a former child chess prodigy and a Skype co-creator. This piles on to Google’s other recent acquisitions of robot maker Boston Dynamics and smart home hardware maker Nest. If Google can succeed in integrating these seemingly disparate companies, it seems like having a conversation with your thermostat isn’t too far off.

Losers of an AI future
While these companies are priming themselves to own any science fiction-like future, there are companies doomed to languish if they don’t change their path.

This includes the lowly hardware maker. The future presented in “Her” doesn’t contain several devices in multiple form factors as we have now, but one handheld device and one wearable earpiece that connects to a cloud-based operating system. IBM, a case study in staying relevant, keeps shedding its hardware operations with its latest $2.3 billion sale of its server business to Lenovo. As the main players build their artificially intelligent ecosystems, the hardware becomes less important as it’s commoditized, and the main differentiation becomes software. Companies might also want more control over their hardware and the user experience, and produce their own. For example, Apple recently purchased a cutting-edge chip maker, Primesense. Microsoft stepped into producing its own hardware with its Surface tablets.

Just a movie?
On the other hand, “Her,” like most future predictions, could be far off base. While it seems artificial intelligence will play a large role in future computing, we may combine such technology with even more screens. The point where computers become more intelligent than humans, called the singularity, may not come as quickly as predicted, and these future bets may be too far off to have any impact on company values today.

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about technological advancement’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

earpieceA new report has concluded that a sizeable proportion of modern technology (in particular smartphones, tablets and other commonly-used gadgets) is extremely over reliant on very rare materials.

If the reports findings are accurate, the scarcity of the metals and metalloids in question, combined with a sharply increasing demand for such devices, could seriously damage design innovation, as well as the manufacture of future products.

The report, compiled by researchers at Yale University, discussed the use of 62 materials found in widely used technology. Ultimately, the study concluded that none of the 62 metals or metalloids could be replaced without damaging the efficiency of the product. In fact, 12 of the 62 materials could not be replaced at all.

The potential substitute materials simply arent up to the job or, perhaps more worryingly, dont actually exist. In either instance, these material shortages could lead to an economic and technological downturn in the development of mobile technology.

All of the rare components listed are difficult and expensive to obtain.

This scarcity of product availability would limit potential profits, as well as creating something of a glass ceiling for innovation and product improvement.

This new report marks the first time that this worrying issue has been properly researched.

In the eyes of many, this study should be seen as a warning and a wake up call. In 2010, China restricted the trading of some of the components featured in the study. It was an act that increased market prices fivefold.

As these materials become increasingly rare, tactics like this may become ever more frequent, causing increased political tension around the world.

It also needs to be stated that the mass manufacture of these devices drains the planet of natural resources and the processing of these materials seriously harms our environment.

The report itself warns that,

“As wealth and population increase worldwide in the next few decades, scientists will be increasingly challenged to maintain and improve product utility by designing new and better materials, but doing so under potential constraints in resource availability.”

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Sure, Google Glass is getting plenty of public ire now, but Bluetooth headsets have been around for much longer. If anything, the quick dismissal of hardcore Bluetooth users was a sign of things to come for wearable technology. The Bluedouche was the original Glasshole.

And yet Jawbone, which earned its reputation as a gadget maker with its first line of Bluetooth headsets, isnt giving up on the sector. With its latest entry, the $130 Era, Jawbone is preparing itself for a potential wireless headset renaissance.

Smartphone users dont just need a way to talk hands-free on the phone they want more accurate ways to send voice commands to their devices and get information without looking down at a screen.

The Jawbone Era aims to be the Bluetooth headset for people who hate Bluetooth headsets. Its tiny, sounds great, and ultimately proves Bluetooth headsets arent dead yet.

Jawbone’s slim new Era on the left, compared to the larger original model.

The good: The most seamless Bluetooth headset yet
Though its significantly smaller than its 2-year-old predecessor, the Era isnt quite as tiny as the ubiquitous earpieces from the Spike Jonze film Her (which, surprisingly, contains some fascinating user interface concepts), but its almost as convenient.

It took me a few tries to position the Era correctly in my ear, but once I got a good fit, it was easy to forget I was wearing an earpiece. A single button on the Eras rear lets you answer calls, pause music, and skip tracks.

For calls, the Era sounds crisp and clear in both directions. I never had any complaints about voice quality from people I was chatting with, and calls sounded slightly clearer compared to using my iPhones earpiece. I also noticed a few instances where Jawbones noise-filtering technology perked up to enhance my voice and block out external noise (a big help on noisy New York City streets).

Jawbone’s Era headset is so small it’s easy to miss.Jawbone

But I ended up using the Era more for commanding my smartphone than taking calls. Its much easier to reach up, tap a button, and ask Siri for help than it is to pull out my phone especially during frigid winter weather. When I asked Siri for directions, I was able to get to my destination simply by following the instructions piped into my ear by the Era. (Of course, you can do this with any pair of earphones with a built-in microphone; the Era just makes it that much easier and more elegant.)

The Era was also surprisingly useful for listening to light background music and podcasts. Sound quality was decent, though it wasnt as loud as I would have liked. It was more comfortable than the wired headphones I usually wear while wandering around the city, especially since I didnt have to worry about any cords. I still noticed the occasional look of disgust from other subway riders, though yes, the poor Bluetooth headset still cant get any love today, even though, ironically enough, many people are sporting earbuds or giant headphones of their own.

Ive used several Bluetooth headsets over the years, and while Ive liked plenty of these, Ive yet to fall in love with any of them. Once the initial honeymoon period wears off, they typically end up gathering dust on my desk. The Era isnt quite the Bluetooth headset of my dreams, but it comes the closest.

The bad: No battery life improvements; it still looks like a Bluetooth headset
On the one hand, we should praise Jawbone for keeping the same four-to-five-hour battery life as the previous, larger Era headset. On the other, it really stinks having to charge it in the middle of the day.

The Jawbone Era charging caseDevindra Hardawar/VentureBeat

Jawbone, at least, recognizes that sort of battery life doesnt cut it these days so while it couldnt pack in more juice, its offering the next best thing with the Era: a tiny portable charging case. Its no different from any other USB battery pack you can get on Amazon. It stores enough juice to fully recharge the Era, and it includes a USB output to simplify the charging process.

While convenient, Jawbone is also cheating a bit by including the battery pack. It allows the company to claim that you can get around 10 hours of battery life with the Era, even when the device itself only reaches half that. Jawbone isnt lying, but the slight confusion around the Eras total battery life when using the battery pack has tripped up many journalists. And if thats the case, Im sure most consumers wont realize the Era doesnt get 10 hours of battery life on its own.

Additionally, while the Era is one of the smallest headsets Ive used, it still looks distinctly like a Bluetooth headset. So unfortunately for Jawbone, it likely wont win over people who wouldnt be caught dead wearing a headset. (But really, we wont see something like that until theres a major breakthrough in battery technology.)

Jawbone Era

The verdict: A Bluetooth headset for a new era
Unless you have serious moral and aesthetic reservations against Bluetooth headsets, the Era is worth a look. It does a great job with calls, and its convenient for speaking voice commands to your phone.

Now more than ever, consumers seem ready to accept Bluetooth headsets. Just look around at all the headphones the next time youre out in public weve trained ourselves to be connected to our devices physically.

Now, we just need to get used to doing so wirelessly.